Safety questions after ND oil train derailment

2:23 AM, Jan 1, 2014   |    comments
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CASSELTON, N.D. (AP) -- A fiery oil train derailment's near-miss of a small North Dakota town had its mayor angrily calling for federal officials to do more to guarantee the safety of the nation's growing shipment of oil by rail.

Government regulators defended their record on moving hazardous materials by rail, noting that 2012 was the safest year in the industry's history. But oil trains have bucked that trend, thanks in part to the massive amount of oil being moved out of western North Dakota, where the industry's rapid growth is far outpacing pipeline development.

No one was hurt when the mile-long BNSF Railway train derailed Monday afternoon near the eastern North Dakota town of Casselton, but the overturned tankers - exploding and engulfed in plumes of flames and black smoke for more than 24 hours - burned so hot that emergency crews didn't even attempt to put out the blaze. Most of Casselton's roughly 2,400 residents agreed to temporarily evacuate due to concerns about unsafe air.

"This is too close for comfort," Casselton Mayor Ed McConnell said Tuesday.

Associated Press

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